King's Buffet

April 21, 2013
by Dee Renaud

We were recently at the King's Buffet restaurant with a group of friends. What an assortment of foods — a true feast! There was so much to choose from and too many choices to have something of everything — everything from breakfast items to desserts. Of course, most of us ate more than we needed to eat and were full, maybe even stuffed. As we drove by the restaurant again a few days later, I read the sign — King's Buffet — and I thought to myself, There's a devotional to write.

The dictionary describes a feast as a banquet, a lavish meal. A feast in ancient Israel was a festival associated with occasions of religious joy. Some feasts mentioned in the Bible are the Feast of Passover and Unleavened Bread, the Feast of Firstfruits, the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost), the Feast of Trumpets (New Year), the Day of Atonement, and the Feast of Tabernacles.

Jesus told the parable of the wedding feast, which prefigures the wedding feast of the Lamb, to be celebrated in heaven when Christ is united with His Bride, the Church.

Matthew 22:2-10 – The Kingdom of heaven is like this. Once there was a king who prepared a wedding feast for his son. He sent his servants to tell the invited guests to come to the feast, but they did not want to come. So he sent other servants with this message for the guests: "My feast is ready now; my steers and prize calves have been butchered, and everything is ready. Come to the wedding feast!" But the invited guests paid no attention and went about their business: one went to his farm, another to his store, while others grabbed the servants, beat them, and killed them. The king was very angry; so he sent his soldiers, who killed those murderers, and burned down their city. Then he called his servants and said to them, "My wedding feast is ready, but the people I invited did not deserve it. Now go to the main streets and invite to the feast as many people as you find." So the servants went out into the streets and gathered all the people they could find, good and bad alike; and the wedding hall was filled with people. (GNT)

Revelation 19:9a – Then the angel said to me, "Write this: Happy are those who have been invited to the wedding feast of the Lamb." (GNT)

God has invited us to His heavenly feast, a glorious celebration of all who have heard the call to come to Jesus, all who are in Christ, all who have accepted His invitation. This is the most important invitation we will ever receive. No excuses! No looking back. Come to the feast!

Can you just imagine what it will be like at the wedding feast of the Lamb? Everyone is welcome there — from every tribe and nation. Come all who are hungry and thirsty — come to the feast of the King. Come to Jesus, Who is the bread of life, and be satisfied — not stuffed, but satisfied. Whoever comes to Jesus will never go hungry or be thirsty again. Jesus loved us so much that He died on the cross so that you and I could have everlasting life in heaven with Him. Come and be the honoured guest of the King; come to the feast! What a celebration that will be!

The invitation has been made. Have you accepted?

    Come to the feast that the Lord hath spread,
    Here every soul may be truly fed;
    Come in the name of your Living Head,
    Washed in the blood of the Lamb.

           Margaret Moody, 1891

Prayer: Heavenly Father, thank You for inviting us to Your heavenly feast. The tables are spread and all is ready. May we all be ready to accept Your invitation today. In Jesus' name, we pray. Amen.

About the author:

Dee Renaud <deerenaud25@gmail.com>
Sauble Beach, Ontario, Canada

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1 Comment

  • PresbyCan Feedback says:

    Thank you Dee. A good devotional.


    Dear Dee: What a heavenly feast that will be!


    Thanks Dee for a wonderful challenge and reminder.


    Wow Dee, that is one banquet I do not want to miss. Thank you.
    (B.C.)


    Dee, this was awesome and I thank you or sharing with us today. Please share again soon with us.


    Great message Dee. What a wonderful celebration is in store, for those who choose the Lamb.
    Enjoy this beautiful day.


    Dee,
    What a good analogy for this devotional. Thanks.
    (Tx)


    Dee,
    Thanks for the good word this morning. The children of God are truly blessed, now and forever more. An insightful message.
    Blessings.


    Dear Dee Renaud,
    Thank you for your inviting devotional.
    I especially liked:
    Can you just imagine what it will be like at the wedding feast of the Lamb? Everyone is welcome there – from every tribe and nation. Come all who are hungry and thirsty – come to the feast of the King. Come to Jesus, Who is the bread of life, and be satisfied – not stuffed, but satisfied. Whoever comes to Jesus will never go hungry or be thirsty again. Jesus loved us so much that He died on the cross so that you and I could have everlasting life in heaven with Him. Come and be the honoured guest of the King; come to the feast! What a celebration that will be!
    Yes, singing, “I come; I come” — rejoicing in the King — “not stuffed, but satisfied”!
    Keep writing,


    Good Morning Dee!
    I quite enjoyed your devotional this morning — partly as the analogy is a perfect fit; partly as this is one of my favourite passages.
    You are correct, the banquet IS ready and all we have to do is one simple thing — accept HIS invitation. But all too often it seems, we get wrapped up in the hustle and bustle of our everyday lives, the “busy-ness” to which we feel we must attend first. We think this part of life must take precedence and we act as if God’s invitation is second in our lives.
    As I read your devotional, the words of a song from my Sunday School began to run through my mind — “I cannot come to the banquet, don’t bother me now …” — it was one of a couple of songs that were often the requests when the Sunday School Superintendent asked what we’d like to sing when we were all gathered together as one large group.
    Like the man in the song, and the wedding banquet invitees, our reply too often is a litany of excuses: “I’m busy,” “not right now,” or “I have commitments.” We give these out of habit to everyone at times, including God. The rest of society may nod in agreement upon hearing the offered excuse and say in reply, “ah yes, I know, you’re busy. Another time perhaps” but another invitation does not come for the excuse has been seen as just that, an excuse (no matter what the “good reason” was at the time!) and we are so busy running hither and yon that we don’t even notice that another invitation is not forthcoming. This one has become a missed opportunity.
    Thankfully, our Heavenly Father is most patient, kind, and loving with His children so He extends the invitation to come and awaits our acceptance.
    His invitation remains once offered. It is not withdrawn. It has no expiration date — all we need do is accept and “come to the banquet!” and partake in the glorious celebration that God has waiting for us, His children.
    Thank you for a truly wonderful devotional this day and please do continue to write!
    God Bless!


    Dear Dee,
    Another powerful devotional! It is my prayer that those who have read this devotional
    will accept His invitation and be ready for the wedding feast of the Lamb. Thank you, Lord!


    Thanks for the reminder about the invitation to the feast.
    The only problem with a ‘buffet’ is that it is ‘serve yourself’. The King we serve serves us. Am I right to be cautious about any idea of grace as something we help ourselves to? George Herbert gets it right in his poem that starts: “LOVE bade me welcome; yet my soul drew back, Guilty of dust and sin….”


    Hello Dee:
    Thank you for your wonderful reminder of the marriage feast of the Lamb. For those of us who observe the feast days and seasons you mentioned, it’s easy to forget the much greater feast yet to come.
    It is good to know that some people, in the protestant congregations, have an understanding of the ancient festivals God gave to his people. The unfortunate thing is they don’t seem to realize those festivals were kept by the earliest Christians, and are still to be observed today.
    Most people believe the feasts you mentioned are Jewish, but as you rightly noted they were feasts kept by ancient Israel, of which the Jews are only one tribe. What most people don’t realize is the festivals each portray a step in God’s plan of salvation for all mankind.
    When I was growing up we never had a Pentecost Sunday. It’s only in more recent years that Pentecost has been celebrated as the birth day of the Christian church. But, few people realize the date of Pentecost – variously called the feast of the harvest, the feast of first fruits, and the feast of weeks – could not be determined without the Passover and days of unleavened bread.
    In your devotional you referred to the feast of trumpets as the new year. That is true, but only as it pertains to the Jewish community. God’s new year is in the spring; the Jewish civil new year is in the autumn. But the feast of trumpets means far more than the Jews understand. The feast of trumpets celebrates the time of his birth.


    Be Blessed Dee.


    Dear Sir, This devotional makes me long for the Lord’s Feast.

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