Not A Number

June 28, 2012
by Rosemary Hagedorn

On April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg, killing 1,517 passengers and crew members.

It was a horrific tragedy, as many lost their lives. It was said that some tombstones had a number inscribed instead of a person's name. The number on the stone represented the number of the unidentified body that was pulled from the frigid waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

Today, we are identified by numbers as well. Serving systems are the most straightforward way to organize waiting customers. As we walk into the store or office, we approach this system, pull a number, and then wait to be served. Whenever we do any banking, we are required to give our client number or savings/chequing account number. If we don't have a social insurance number, we do not exist. We have telephone numbers, birthday numbers, and house numbers. There are numbers for high blood pressure, low blood pressure, heart rate (which is a number of heart beats per unit of time) and numbers on our clocks, speedometers, and television channels. It seems that we are ruled by numbers and are identified by some number or other in this day and age. Our name just doesn't cut it!

We are not a number to God. He knows all about us.

Matthew 10:30 – But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. (NASB)

He knew us even before we were born.

Psalm 139:13 – For You formed my inward parts; You wove me in my mother's womb. (NASB)

Prayer: Father, in this day and age when everyone and everything asks for our number instead of our name, we thank You that we are not a number to You, but rather each one of us is created uniquely and lovingly to serve You and our fellow man. Amen.

About the author:

Rosemary Hagedorn <rosyhagedorn@gmail.com>
Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada

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