The God Of Nature

January 25, 1997
by Robin Ross

One of the great missionaries from Scotland, Daniel Crawford, was asked to speak in Boston in 1913. After he had delivered an inspiring message about the need of preaching the gospel to everyone, a fashionable lady came up to him and said, "Why don't the natives just look up through nature to nature's God?"

"That's exactly what they do," replied Crawford. "They know that there is a Supreme Being, but oh, the thoughts they have of him! Everywhere they see the strong devouring the weak. The lion pulls down the antelope, locusts destroy their crops, and disease kills their children. So when they gaze heavenward, they think God doesn't really care what happens to them." He explained that while the Lord's power and wise design are evident in creation, that is not enough to lead to a full understanding of God.

So many people talk about worshipping God in nature. But though we may be able to worship God in nature, nature is not sufficient to lead us to Jesus Christ. Where in nature do we find: "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life"?

Or where in nature will we ever hear Jesus saying: "Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with me"?

Only in God's revelation of Himself through the Bible will we find those things [John 3:16 and Revelation 3:20].

Prayer: Help us, Lord God, to remember that everyone needs you desperately, so that when we have opportunity to talk to someone about your loving plan for our lives, we don't fail to take advantage of it. Amen.

About the author:

Robin Ross <rross@telus.net>
Mission, British Columbia, Canada

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